Delivering Hope

Because no one is just another brick in the wall.

 

Acknowledging Volunteers: Jails, Prisons, and Post-Incarceration Reentry

 

Volunteers who give of their time in jails, prisons, and reentry impact lives.  One woman who showed up at an event in the jail where she was sentenced saw a volunteer one evening - a woman she'd seen volunteering over several years.  The woman serving time said, "You're still here [i.e., volunteering].  Oh.....somebody actually cares."

Yes, volunteers care.  Prison and reentry volunteers participate in "civic engagement" that touches lives taht are among the most marginalized. Fyodor Dostoevsky: "The degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons.""When I was in prison, you visited me." (Matthew 25:36)  "Whatsover you do for the least of your fellows, that you do for me." (Matthew 25:45)  Making a difference in jails, prisons, and reentry "raises the boat" for everyone; it measurably makes "the bottom" higher.

We acknowledge volunteers here.    The National Network of Prison Nonprofits invites statements of volunteer acknowledgement from "prison and reentry nonprofits," jails and prisons, faith leaders, people who have received services and support from "prison and reentry volunteers," and other organizations that come into contact with "prison and reentry volunteers" (corrections-focused organizations, universities, etc.).

How to submit volunteer acknowledgement: Submit your statment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (with "volunteer acknowledgement" in the subject line).  Tell us: Who you are (name and organization), your contact information (including state), name of the volunteer, dates of volunteerism, three to five sentences about the volunteer's activities and impact (for publication), and - if possible - contact information for notifying the volunteer taht they are being acknowledged.  Submissions may be followed-up on before being posted here.


National Volunteers

Information Pending

Volunteers by State

Under development

 

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

D.C.

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana 

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

Mark Adolph and Len Kannapell - both of Seattle - travel every spring to bring the play Pair o' Postles to correctional facilities throughout western states and provinces.

 Irene Morgan of Bellingham, Washington's Restorative Community Coalition had her name put forward for recognition of her tireless, ongoing work to assist formerly incarcerated individuals to integrate into the local community.

Al Lapenteur has been recommended for recognition as a chaplain at Monroe Correctional Complex in Monroe, Washington serving the spiritual needs of the individuals attending the Catholic Criminal Justice Ministry and for visiting the prison hospital.  Al often prepares reflections on scripture and delivers encouraging messages that are greatly appreciated by incarcerated individuals.  He always has a kind word, is willing to listen, and provides referral letters as individuals prepare for release.  Al has been a great resource to the Jesuits bringing in their meditation/prayer program.  Incarcerated individuals really appreciate the effort Al puts into the ministry to help them develop and strengthen their faith. 

 

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

 

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